Tribal Days
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October 31, 2014
The old Maxwells was the most beloved rock venue in New Jersey and perhaps the entire east coast. The sound was simply the best. And the venue was the most hospitable to every band that played, no matter how big or small the draw. For Peter Carr to really diminish all that by calling it a dive and making the patrons sound like animals, he's really staining the legacy of this place. And to see it now as just another typical sports bar with cover bands and wimpy singer songwriters really breaks my heart. I'd rather see it closed for good than to see it like this.
assilem
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October 31, 2014
Mass transit is the solution? How about virtue offices?
assilem
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October 31, 2014
Craziness. The crazy lady in charge of murals makes a mockery of the City and this otherwise competent man is forced to resign so Fulop can have a political career. Poor decision Fulop.
assilem
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October 31, 2014
I am jealous that JC gets an experienced Chief. We the green peas in Hoboken.
Can Our Plan Kick Off Our Daughter Because Her Job Offers Coverage? *
by JONATHAN M. METSCH, DR.P.H., LLC
Oct 31, 2014 | 74 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Q. My 24-year-old daughter was covered under her father's health insurance, which is a grandfathered plan. She started working and was offered coverage through her employer. My husband's employer said she had to sign up for her employer's insurance and could not stay on his policy. Is that true? A. Not anymore. Under the health law, health plans that offer dependent coverage have to allow adult children to stay on their parents’ plan until they turn 26 under most circumstances, even if the young adults are married or financially independent. The law initially allowed one major exception for grandfathered plans—those that were in existence before the health law passed in March 2010 and hadn’t changed substantially since then. Those plans could refuse to cover adult children if they had an offer of employer-based coverage elsewhere, such as through their own jobs. However, starting last January, that exception no longer applies. A 24-year-old such as your daughter should be able to remain on her father’s plan until she turns 26, even if her own job also offers health insurance. The original provision, which went into effect six months after the law passed, was likely intended to ease the transition to new coverage rules for employer group plans, says Sara Collins, vice president at the Commonwealth Fund. According to an FAQ from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, that was indeed the case. “Our goal is to cover as many young adults under the age of 26 as possible with the least amount of burden,” the document says. * KasierHealthNews “Can Our Plan Kick Off Our Daughter Because Her Job Offers Coverage?” By Michelle Andrews http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2014/June/20/Can-Our-Plan-Kick-Off-Our-Daughter-Because-Her-Job-Offers-Coverage.aspx?utm_campaign=KHN%3A+Daily+Health+Policy+Report&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=13246999&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--0h1XDOlav5wjP67-uTNl6q4nDlsx1IGmKtP5g03bjkCzQXtlHry8OFYphXz11z6lNwPPufrizRfT0i5HmyeVP2gJDmy7whgYl2-iQ5-KPkklJVoU&_hsmi=13246999 Doctor, Did You Wash Your Hands? ™ provides information to consumers on understanding, managing and navigating health care options. Jonathan M. Metsch, Dr.P.H., is Clinical Professor, Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; and Adjunct Professor, Baruch College ( C.U.N.Y.), Rutgers School of Public Health, and Rutgers School of Public Affairs and Administration. This blog shares general information about understanding and navigating the health care system. For specific medical advice about your own problems, issues and options talk to your personal physician.
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