Port Authority to upgrade tunnels damaged by Sandy
Sep 27, 2016 | 149 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Port Authority’s Board of Commissioners met Thursday Sept 22 and approved the overhaul of two PATH tunnels between New York's World Trade Center station and New Jersey's Exchange Place station. The press release state the repairs will "upgrade critical rail, electrical and signal systems damaged by Superstorm Sandy nearly four years ago." The $400 million project will replace track, rail, signal, electrical and communication infrastructure along the tunnels. According to the release construction will take place on weekends and will begin in the third quarter of 2017 and wont be completed until 2026 and "will be done on 35 weekends per year." The releases added "there will be single-track operation during weekend work to allow for continuous train service, and to minimize passenger inconvenience and disruption." “PATH is a critical lifeline between New Jersey and New York, and the investment we approved today is vital to keep it operating safely and efficiently,” said Port Authority Chairman John Degnan. “This project, coupled with one we are doing to install a new computerized signal system, will allow us to accommodate projected growth in mass transit for many years to come.” “We are laser-focused on making sure the transportation assets we own are properly maintained to ensure their ability to serve the tens of millions of travelers who rely on them every year,” said Port Authority Vice Chairman Steven Cohen. “Hurricane Sandy took a major toll on PATH and on other critical transportation facilities, and this project will aim to not only fix the damage, but mitigate future potential problems from severe flooding.” Currently, the Port Authority is installing a comprehensive, federally mandated computerized signal system on PATH’s 33rd Street Line to improve passenger service and safety. That work is being done on weekends and will continue through December 2016, excluding holidays. Those upgrades are designed to improve service quality and increase passenger capacity.
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Jersey City launches campaign to reduce pedestrian-motor vehicle crashes
Sep 27, 2016 | 155 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
JERSEY CITY – Mayor Steven Fulop and the Jersey City Police Department announced Thursday that Jersey City is once again participating in Be Street Smart NJ Pedestrian Safety Campaign this September. The Be Street Smart NJ campaign is a collaborative effort between public, private and non-profit organizations to educate pedestrians and motorists about making safety their top priority whether walking or driving. The statewide Street Smart NJ campaign is managed by the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority (NJTPA) and began in 2013. The campaign urges pedestrians and motorists to “Check Your Vital Signs” to improve safety on the road. Motorists are urged to obey the speed limit and stop for pedestrians in crosswalks. Pedestrians are told to use crosswalks and wait for the walk signal where applicable. A new “Heads Up, Phone Down” message has been added to the campaign this year to combat distracted driving and walking. Pedestrian safety is an ongoing challenge in New Jersey. In 2014, 170 pedestrians died as a result of pedestrian-vehicle crashes, according to the most recent data available from the New Jersey State Police. From 2010 through 2014, 749 pedestrians were killed on New Jersey’s roads and more than 17,000 were injured, according to the New Jersey State Police. That translates into one death every 2.4 days and 11 injuries daily. “We are working to educate the community so they know the steps they can take to ensure their own safety and the consequences for violating the law,” says Mayor Fulop. “The endgame is to prevent crashes and save lives. Jersey City has worked diligently to make streets and intersections safer, but motorists and residents must be street smart.” In addition to education, targeted enforcement in the form of “Cops in Crosswalks” will take place throughout Jersey City. An undercover police officer is the pedestrian while uniformed officers are in the vicinity to pull over motorists who fail to stop for the pedestrian in the crosswalk. Officers will also address speeding and distracted driving and walking, which often contribute to crashes involving pedestrians. This enforcement will be funded by a grant award from the NJ Division of Highway Traffic Safety.
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Hoboken City Council hosted public meeting on 500-foot rule for bars
Sep 27, 2016 | 214 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
HOBOKEN-- Approximately 30 residents, business owners, and council members turned out at a Hoboken council meeting on Monday to discuss a possible repeal of the town's 500-foot rule, which states that no establishment with a liquor license can open within 500 feet of another establishment with a liquor license. Last month the council introduced the possibility of amending the ordinance by deleting the rule. Members of the community expressed either concern or support for the change. Some members of the community including Michael Gallucci, owner of the Green Rock and Grand Vin, cited issues such as high rents and feeling trapped in his lease as a few reason as to why he feels the law should be repealed. Other members, such as Eugene Flinn, the owner of Amanda's, Elysian Cafe, and Schnackenberg's, expressed concern that business owners with liquor licenses might flock to already concentrated areas of bars and restaurants downtown and on Washington Street. All council members expressed their desire to hear more public feedback on the rule. For more on the meeting, read the upcoming edition of the Hoboken Reporter this weekend, Oct 2. The council may consider the repeal as early as a meeting next week.
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Tim Alexander
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September 27, 2016
As a Hoboken resident and home owner in Ward 1, I very much support this. More competition is always a good thing. If Green Rock or Northern Soul get an immediate benefit to their businesses as well, then that's great. I'm glad Northern Soul is coming back, and the folks at Green Rock have run a tight ship since I was at Stevens (2005 grad). Maybe we'll finally have some new options on Hudson Place. It would be nice if Cooper's Union wasn't the only place in the area that knew how to make a good cocktail.