Rishat
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February 25, 2018
The number of people in Spain who died of influenza has increased dramatically. In what is the most deadly season of the last decade, about 472 deaths have been attributed to the aggressive influenza virus. Since the National Network for Epidemiological Surveillance in the Carlos III Health Institute was identified in November, all the related cases have been reported. From January 29 to February 4, 4,116 new deaths were registered. One of the unusual and mysterious studies in medicine today is the immunogram. What is it and what does it eat? Today in all hospitals, district doctors with enviable persistence advise us to check the immunity and make an immunogram "Please help prevent the spread of the flu" February 21, 2018 With any influenza virus I can cope with play I am a Muslim 5 times a day doing ablution in icy water, and my feet once a day but in warm water, do not work, calm, food and drink healthy. And one more trump card. I have diabetes insipidus, another type of diabetes. With 4 years I take medicine adiuretin, 3 times a day. Now to me of 40 years For this illness I can drink 20 liters of water in day if to not accept a medicine. But even though I take the medicine, I still drink 3 to 5 liters of water a day. And as you know, the flu does not like water. 20% of people suffer from increased immunity. Only they have a congenital and I have acquired immunity Immunogram analysis A complex medical study of venous blood, which includes many examinations, is called an immunogram, a picture of which, in deciphering the results, will determine the state of the immune system. The increase in T-lymphocytes in the immunogram indicates the hyperactivity of the immune system. At a rate of 600 to 2500, I have 2835 Insufficient activity of T-suppressors leads to the predominance of the influence of T-helpers, which contributes to a stronger and more mundane response. At a rate of 450 to 850, I have 1808. T-killers, cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, CTL (a type of T-lymphocytes that carry out lysis of damaged cells of their own organism). Targets of T-killers are cells afflicted with intracellular parasites (which include viruses and certain types of bacteria), tumor cells. At a rate of 270 to 540 I have 945. Despite the treatment, olivopontocerebellar degenerations have a steadily progressing course. The duration of the disease on average fluctuates within 10-15 years, sometimes reaches 20 years. After that, the patient usually dies, To me 40 years illness or disease congenital but was shown in 15 years. I think that you will not argue with medical statistics. I'm alive because of my very strong immunity.
Rishat
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February 25, 2018
I'd like to help treat the flu. I have a very strong immune system. White blood cells copy.
Fulop looks ahead
Mayor’s State of the City speech is full of hope, tinged with regret
by Al Sullivan
Reporter staff writer
Feb 25, 2018 | 410 views | 0 0 comments | 36 36 recommendations | email to a friend | print
CITY
LOOKING AHEAD – Mayor Steven Fulop set the agenda for his second term with his State of the City Address
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Full of the expected platitudes of former and future success, the first State of the State Address of Mayor Steven Fulop’s second term could not skirt some of the most significant and troubling issues of his first term: the impact of the recently-completed revaluation of property and a police corruption scandal. While both were presented atop a rosy bed of the successes his administration accomplished since he took office in July 2013, the issues remain part of an undercurrent of discontent. Property owners have seen their estimated taxes jump, and, behind the scenes, cops are unhappy with the city’s doing away with a lucrative off-duty jobs program. “It is not lost on me that the city is also undergoing a tax revaluation which has proven to be extremely difficult for many residents,” Fulop said. “It is no secret that I opposed this reval every step of the way during the past four years, not because I didn’t think that balancing taxes was important, but rather, I opposed it because I knew it was going to be tremendously disruptive to long term residents and that we could be caught in a place that could force some residents out of their homes.” New Jersey law, he said, approaches revaluations in a way that provides very little flexibility to homeowners or municipalities like Jersey City. “Without frequent revaluations, the problem is compounded every year. This is made worse when one mayor doesn’t do a revaluation in a timely manner,” Fulop said. “In our case here in Jersey City, 25 years went by before the topic was even discussed. When that happens, it creates a situation where there is no good choice between doing a reval and not doing a reval.” He said after 25 years, the city was left with only two “unfortunate choices,” to conduct the reval so that taxes are balanced but long-term residents are forced out of their homes, or not to conduct the reval so that taxes remain imbalanced, but long-term residents can stay in their homes. “With that said, the choice to undertake a reval was taken away from Jersey City last year when Governor Christie forced us to move forward,” Fulop said. In complying with the order, the city was committed to doing the reval in the fairest way possible. “We have made information and data on this process more transparent than any other municipality in New Jersey ever has,” he said. “We are also aware that revaluations could potentially impact property values, and this concern is heightened by the new Trump tax plan that limits state and local tax deductions.” Fulop said that he will submit a proposal to the City Council to conduct a second revaluation next year in order to account for the impacts to the market that may occur this year. “I have discussed this with the reval company, and we will be able to do this at a fraction of the cost of the current reval since home inspectors have already been through the initial reval process,” he said. “We will use any changes in the real estate market to balance out taxes next year to a fair level for the entire city based on sales that occur after this year’s drastic changes in taxes. We are doing our best to make this difficult time as manageable as possible for residents because we don’t want any resident to have to struggle.” Police scandal addressed Dressed up in slightly less odious terms, the mayor also commented on the police off-duty work scandal that has resulted in criminal charges against a former police chief and 11 police officers. The investigation is ongoing, and could result in charges being filed against additional officers in the future. Over the protest of some police, as well as Councilman Richard Boggiano, Fulop and Public Safety Director James Shea ordered the decades-old program shut down. “Being mayor also includes making decisions that may be unpopular but are ultimately the best decisions for the city as a whole,” Fulop said. “Recently, I announced that we will be ending the off-duty police program later this year.” He said every mayor since the 1990s has known that there are serious issues with this program, including the potential for corruption. “While it was not the easiest decision to end this program, I am confident that it is the right decision,” Fulop said. “For those of you that are skeptical, I’d like you to ask yourself one simple question on the necessity of this program: why is it that our neighbors in New York City can build 100 story buildings in a more densely populated area and not require one police officer be hired as long as they have a safety plan in place, but here in Jersey City we require countless officers be hired for smaller projects?” He said the cost of these officers on projects such as those done by local utilities companies is passed onto consumers with increased rates. “The hiring of off-duty officers for these types of jobs is ultimately a backdoor tax on you as a resident,” he said, noting that the city will institute a new plan. “We are going to require safety plans for construction sites prior to site plan approval. We will also set up a program to hire trained community members and use existing crossing guards to monitor these sites instead of off-duty police officers.” This will root out corruption while giving Jersey City residents an opportunity to work. “Furthermore, we will be pursuing rate reduction conversations with the utilities companies now that the costly requirement for officers is no longer there, and we expect that you the taxpayers to see rate savings as a result,” he said.
_____________ “As mayor, the most meaningful part of my job is having the opportunity to connect with residents on issues large and small.” – Steven Fulop
____________

Focusing on the future “The state of our city is strong, and getting stronger,” Fulop said. “Every day, regardless of the neighborhood in which you live, you are impacted by the progress we have made during the past four years.” He said the police department had grown to its largest number in two decades, new businesses have opened, and Jersey City is experiencing a “renaissance away from the waterfront.” There are new parks and recreation programs. “Our success will not rest on what we have accomplished, but rather, our accomplishments will serve as a blueprint for the future of Jersey City,” he said. “Our goals have not changed. We are continuing to work towards a safer city, one that applauds diversity, encourages innovation, and invites the community to be part of the progress. “ He said in 2017, Jersey City saw decreases in all major crime categories including homicides, assaults, and robberies, and police have removed 23 percent more illegal guns from the street than in 2016. “During the past five years, we have been hyper-focused on growing our police department with an emphasis on enhancing the diversity of our officers,” he said, noting that the city appointed new police and fire chiefs last year and have developed a number of crime fighting initiatives. This includes a new traffic safety program. “Earlier this year, I signed an Executive Order adopting the Vision Zero initiative for Jersey City, setting a goal to eliminate traffic fatalities on our roadways by 2026,” he said. The new year will continue the city’s commitment to creating more parks and renovations of existing parks such as the Leonard Gordon Park in The Heights. “The increase in the number of parks that are being renovated is directly tied to the open space tax initiative that our administration championed last year,” Fulop said. “With improvements to our parks comes improvements to our Recreation Department as well… Later this year, we plan to partner with the Board of Education to focus on an initiative that is specifically for special needs individuals who are over 18.” He said the city has received a state grant of $2 million that will provide better bicycle lanes throughout the city, as part of a new Bike Master Plan. “In just a few weeks, we will cut the ribbon on the new City Hall Annex in Bergen-Lafayette,” he said. “When we move in we will be saving over a million dollars in of rent in year one. It will also be a major change to the Ward F landscape by creating more activity and opportunity…Once we complete the ribbon cutting in March, we will present phase two of this project to the City Council, which includes a second building next door to the current annex that will be used by both the community and city government, as well as a large parking deck to be used by the neighborhood. Our goal is to move a number of important city departments into the adjacent building, including a revamped affordable housing office.” He said the city is moving ahead with plans throughout the city such as a new parking deck and police station in the Heights, a new police station downtown and a new Jersey City Museum and artist center in Journal Square. “Later this month, the Liberty Science Center will be putting forward their final site plan with the city to move on a 14-acre expansion of the Liberty Science Center,” Fulop said Running the city is a community effort, he said. “As mayor, the most meaningful part of my job is having the opportunity to connect with residents on issues large and small,” he said. “I have continued to prioritize communication and honesty between government and residents, and I hope you feel both appreciated and respected.” Al Sullivan may be reached at asullivan@hudsonreporter.com.
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Bar crawl clash
Controversy after city closes five bars during upcoming ‘Leprecon’
by Marilyn Baer
Reporter Staff Writer
Feb 25, 2018 | 365 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The city of Hoboken Alcohol Beverage Control (ABC) Board held their regular bi-weekly meeting on Thursday, Feb. 22 to consider various charges against 11 Hoboken liquor licensees. As a result, the city said, five bars will close this coming weekend (March 3 to 4) during the upcoming “LepreCon” bar crawls on Saturday. New Mayor Ravi Bhalla has pledged to clamp down on holiday bar crawls in the mile-square city because of past rowdiness, particularly in December at the “SantaCon” bar crawl. The crawls usually occur on the first Saturday of March, a day when the city used to hold the St. Patrick's Day Parade each year. The parade was canceled in 2012 because of accompanying rowdiness in bars and at private house parties. Mayor Dawn Zimmer wanted to move the parade to a weekday, but the St. Patrick's Parade Committee refused. In the parade’s absence, bar owners participated in privately run bar crawls each year. Last year there were 220 officers on patrol and roughly 20,000 people who participated. Hoboken Chief of Police Ken Ferrante estimated at the time the maximum cost to taxpayers to keep the revelry under control at $98,000 in overtime for Hoboken officers and $26,000 for outside law enforcement. According to the city, five local bars will be closed next Saturday, March 3. However, supporters of the bars on Twitter on Friday were unhappy with the news. Some bars have said in past Reporter stories that the revenue they make around these St. Patrick’s Day-related celebrations helps keep them in business, particularly as summer months are slower. One of the bars is under a 30-day suspension, another under a 20-day suspension, and a third under a 24-day suspension. A bar on First Street is under a two-day suspension from March 3 to March 4. A Washington Street bar will be closed on March 3 and was ordered closed again on May 21 for a 30-day suspension. After the 30-day suspension, it will permanently close pending the transfer or sale of the license to new ownership. The police reports on the issues at the bars detail various menaces. One says that an altercation at a bar allegedly put the customer in the hospital and ended up in a coma. According to the city, six other establishments agreed to settlements as well, but received lesser penalties. “This represents a major accomplishment in fulfilling my commitment on Inauguration Day to address this public safety nuisance,” said Mayor Ravi Bhalla in a press release from the city. “The vast majority of bar owners are responsible license holders, but a very small number of establishments have failed to adequately control their patrons and the activities within their premises, leading to severe public safety issues. The discipline agreed to by the owners is appropriate and I hope will lead to an understanding that public safety is a top priority and that the ABC board will not hesitate to enforce the liquor license regulations.” Additionally, the State of New Jersey Attorney General’s Division of Alcohol Beverage Control has agreed to send 12 to 14 state ABC detectives to Hoboken on March 3. Along with Hoboken Police ABC detectives, they will be monitoring establishments to ensure compliance with all ABC regulations, including not admitting underage guests, not overserving patrons, not exceeding capacity, and other health and security regulations. “I am extremely thankful to New Jersey Office of the Attorney General and its ABC Division Director David P. Rible for his partnership in protecting the public safety and quality of life of our community,” added Bhalla. Watch hudsonreporter.com for future and past coverage on related issues. Email editorial@hudsonreporter.com with comments.
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Car sharing nearby
Uber opens office on Meadowlands Parkway
by Hannington Dia
Reporter Staff Writer
Feb 25, 2018 | 351 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
UBER
The mayor and Town Council join Uber officials in a ribbon cutting for the company’s first driver support center in Secaucus.
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The ride-sharing service Uber celebrated the official opening of its new driver support center on Meadowlands Parkway in Secaucus on Feb. 20. Mayor Michael Gonnelli and Town Council members were on hand for the official ribbon cutting outside the specialized center, the first one in Secaucus and the only one in New Jersey. First established in Hoboken in 2015, Uber said they moved the local office to Secaucus because it has ample space for the office and parking. The center expects to serve 2,000 drivers weekly, according to Uber spokesman Craig Ewer. To use Uber, customers must tap an app on their phones and put in their address and destination. The company gives them a price for the trip, as well as a price if they want to share the trip with other riders. The company has had some controversy, as its drivers often do not have to get the expensive licenses and follow the same regulations as taxi drivers. They often head to their destinations by using a GPS system and don’t always know the local area the way taxi drivers do. However, some find Uber much better priced and more convenient than calling a local cab service. This Uber location is not for customers to come rent a car, but for the drivers to stop in for a break. “It’s an honor to have you here,” Gonnelli said, at a press conference prior to the ribbon cutting. “It’s a pleasure – we’ll see how it works out.” “We really hope to take our commitment to our driver partners here to the next level, by providing the customer support they need, and also a place to relax between trips,” said Ewer. According to Uber General Manager Brian Hughes, demand for Uber in Secaucus has been rising, from “people going out to dinner on a weekend, going to a doctor’s appointment during the week, to even getting around just to the grocery center.” In Secaucus, many users take an Uber and transfer to NJ Transit’s Secaucus Junction to catch a train. Uber officials say the location is also beneficial because of its proximity to train access and highways such as Route 3. Disruption Uber serves 60 countries and 400 cities worldwide. But with expansion, there comes competition. Taxi drivers in various countries have protested against Uber, arguing Uber was imposing on their livelihoods and reducing their fares. “What we’ve seen is, we’re actually able to thrive alongside many other transportation options over time,” Hughes responded. He said often, people take Uber instead of using their personal vehicles. Ronald Griffin, an Uber driver and Emerson resident who was at the opening, said he puts in 60 to 80 hours weekly driving. “It’s called progress,” said Griffin, 73. “IBM used to make electric typewriters. They don’t make them anymore. Why not? They have laptops. They used to have payphones. Can you find any payphones? No, because you’ve got cell phones. People love it, it’s cheaper, it’s safer, and reliable.”
_____________ “It’s very sad what’s happening to the taxi business.” – John Berole
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What about regulations? Unlike in New York City, where Uber drivers must get a special license to transport passengers, in New Jersey, no such regulation exists. All one needs to become an Uber driver in the state is an ID, a personal insurance policy, be at least 21 years old, and pass a background check to drive, according to Ewer. Does that deregulation leave Uber users in New Jersey at a heightened risk? “What we’ve found is that safety is one of the main reasons that people choose Uber on a regular basis,” Ewer said. “When you’re in an Uber, the trip is always on the map. There’s real accountability through GPS records. The technology really makes sure that nobody is driving anonymously.” Mixed reviews Local taxi drivers weren’t as optimistic. “Uber is not what people think,” said John Berole, a driver and part-time dispatcher for Secaucus Taxi. “It’s not reliable.” Anyone who wants to drive for a taxi company in Secaucus has to apply for a special license at Town Hall, Berole said. This is an extra expense that Uber drivers in town do not have to worry about. “Uber can get away without these regulations because they’ve spent millions lobbying the state of New Jersey,” he said. A report from the New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission helps support Berole’s lobbying claims. According to the report, Uber spent over $159,000 in 2015 to lobby Trenton against a bill that would regulate its drivers. Another report from the New York Public Interest Research Group found that the company spent over $1.2 million lobbying Albany in the first half of 2017. Berole also claimed that Secaucus police often harass taxi drivers picking up people at the Meadowlands Expo Center after events, but ignore Uber drivers doing the same thing. “They’ll be cabbies lined up there to make a few bucks,” he said. “Police come, ‘Move; get the hell out of here!’ Then at the same time you see Uber guys picking up – no problem. It’s very sad, what’s happening to the taxi business.” At Secaucus Junction’s taxi stand Feb. 21, two cabbies struggling to pick up fares also said Uber was cutting into their profits. Joe, a driver for Access Taxi, recalled a time when a potential passenger needed a ride to Morristown. His going price was $90. “She got on the phone and Uber lets her go for $37,” Joe said. “Now, how the hell are we supposed to beat that? That’s not fair to us. They don’t belong here with us.” Jerry, a driver for Josie’s Limo Service, said the Port Authority Police gave him three tickets for a drop off at Newark Airport. However, he claims, they often leave Uber drivers alone. “At the MetLife Stadium, they have a special lane for Uber,” he said. “We taxis, they chase us away from the stadium.” However, Jerry also places some blame on taxi drivers themselves, saying they need to do more to bring charges against Uber. “This message should be delivered to the governor of New Jersey,” he said. “He’s not going to know this until we talk in a loud voice together, as taxi drivers, as people, as customers, and try to talk and speak. Everybody has to come together.” Hannington Dia can be reached at hd@hudsonreporter.com
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