Bayonne Briefs
Jul 18, 2018 | 2900 views | 0 0 comments | 73 73 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Matthew Delgado (left), a U.S. Navy Information Systems Technician 3rd Class from Bayonne, high fives Cmdr. Leroy Mitchell, the commanding officer of the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Benfold (DDG 65) after winning a Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) event on the ship’s flight deck. The USS Benfold is forward-deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (Photo by Anna Van Nuys)
Matthew Delgado (left), a U.S. Navy Information Systems Technician 3rd Class from Bayonne, high fives Cmdr. Leroy Mitchell, the commanding officer of the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Benfold (DDG 65) after winning a Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) event on the ship’s flight deck. The USS Benfold is forward-deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (Photo by Anna Van Nuys)
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Coptic Festival returns for its third year

St. Abanoub & St. Antonious Coptic Orthodox Church, which is made up of residents from the growing Egyptian community in Jersey City and Bayonne, is hosting its Third Annual Bayonne Coptic Festival from July 27-29. On Friday the 29th, the festival will run from 3 to 11 p.m.; on Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Egyptian food, games, live music, rides, and vendors will be on hand.

Outside the area near Paterson, Hudson County has the largest percentage of Arab Americans in the state. Most are in Jersey City and Bayonne, including the largest population of Coptic Christians in the United States. During the latter part of the 20th century, the North New Jersey area attracted many Coptic Christians from Egypt, partly for its proximity to high quality education and career opportunities.

Bayonne Renaissance Festival cancelled

The Bayonne Renaissance Festival that was scheduled for July 21 was abruptly cancelled due to organizational and funding issues. The festival ran for two consecutive years at 16th Street Park, with last year garnering hundreds of attendees despite soaring temperatures and rain. The festival was born from grassroots organizing by the local arts and theater community but grew too big to manage by a small group of unincorporated organizers.

Without establishing as a nonprofit corporation, the organization is limited in its ability to raise funds and gain sponsors. The festival is primarily funded through revenue generated from theater productions throughout the year organized by the Bayonne Theater Company and its head organizer, Jennifer Lubach, and ticket sales from the event.

Revenue from those events was smaller this year than last, partly due to higher production costs. Applying for permits, contracting vendors, and hiring talent proved to be too costly this year, but organizers are hopeful that it can start up again.

One of the festival’s primary organizers, Adam Semanchik, is hosting a night of medieval-themed performances at McFadden’s Pub at 17 East 21st Street at 3 p.m. on July 21, titled “Not the Bayonne Renaissance Festival.”

Michael McCabe fills father’s post as county medical services coordinator

The Hudson County Board of Freeholders voted this week to approve the appointment of Michael G. McCabe to the position of Hudson County Emergency Medical Services Coordinator. McCabe will replace his father, the retiring H. Mickey McCabe.

Michael McCabe will fill the remainder of his father’s three-year term which is set to expire on June 30, 2021.

NJ slowly moving away from PARCC testing

New Jersey will begin moving away from the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) exams and toward new statewide testing, according to The Record. The transition is expected to take a couple of years, Gov. Phil Murphy said Tuesday, but it will begin in the 2019 school year. Among the first phases will be reducing the length of testing by 25 percent and reducing the effects the tests have on teacher evaluations.

Woman allegedly struck with car by police officer files suit against city

Mariem Salama, 56, who was allegedly struck with a car by a police officer while crossing Avenue C in front of City Hall on April 18, has filed a $3 million tort claim against the city. The officer who accidentally struck the woman was turning left onto Avenue C from West 27th Street when he did not see Salama in time to come to a complete stop, according to a police report. The officer stayed on the scene with Salama until she was transported to Bayonne Medical Center for treatment.

Distressed whale at Sandy Hook freed

A distressed humpback whale has been disentangled from a commercial fishing net that had become wrapped around the mammal’s mouth, according to the Asbury Park Press. Federal responders freed the whale in an intricate maneuver Wednesday in Sandy Hook Bay. The net had been hampering the whale for several months.

Lawmakers seeking new anti-drug efforts for schools

Legislative proposals under consideration in Trenton would require New Jersey schools to expand drug-abuse education starting in seventh grade, screen students for potential misuse beginning in ninth grade, and stock opioid antidotes in all high schools, according to NJ Spotlight. The measure on opioid antidotes, which passed unanimously in June, is awaiting the signature of Gov. Phil Murphy.

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