Commissioners get an earful about Appleview approval
Contract awarded for pool upgrade, hopefully finished by Memorial Day
by Vanessa Cruz
Reporter Staff Writer
Feb 17, 2013 | 2162 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
SAFETY CONCERNS – The Transco Williams gas pipeline has been one of the crucial concerns for those opposing the Appleview development, like Herb Shaw.
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Now that the proposed Appleview condominium development on River Road has been approved by the North Bergen Planning Board, residents brought objections to the Board of Commissioners meeting on Tuesday.

After five years of hearings and court action, the Planning Board approved the project Feb. 5, despite concerns from neighbors about soil removal from the Palisade Cliffs and fears that a high-pressure, aging natural gas pipeline that crosses part of the site could pose a safety risk.

The Transco Williams pipeline was called into question by Janice Zorovich of the North Bergen Concerned Citizens Group and by resident Herb Shaw, who had attended the meeting when Appleview was approved. Zorovich and Shaw said their concerns were not resolved by the Planning Board.

Zorovich complained about easements. The developers have asked both North Bergen and Guttenberg to approve easements allowing them access to land abutting theirs for maintenance or emergencies.

“They held over the [Planning Board] meeting from October and it was only one easement, and now they have four easements [and] nobody knows where [they] are,” said Zorovich.
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“The gas pipeline is inherently unsafe.” – Herb Shaw
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“The gas pipeline is inherently unsafe,” said Shaw.

Mayor Nicholas Sacco explained to Zorovich and Shaw that the Board of Commissioners does not determine whether developments are approved.

“It doesn’t come to us,” said Sacco. “[It’s been] six years of hearings.”

But Township Administrator Chris Pianese said the town agrees with the board’s decision.

“We’re satisfied with the [approval],” said Pianese.

On the agenda

Rich Picerno Builders of Kenilworth was the lowest bidder and was awarded a contract to rehabilitate North Bergen’s splash park at the municipal pool for $212,375. Pianese said the splash park needed some fixes for the last couple of years. It will now be brand new.

“We’re trying to get it ready for this pool season,” said Pianese. “It should be done before Memorial Day weekend; that’s the goal.”

A salary range ordinance was adopted for a part-time confidential aide to the mayor with a minimum of $20,000 and a maximum of $40,000. Shaw asked for further clarification of the ordinance.

“We replaced one full-time position and created two part-time positions,” said Pianese. “It’s a $12,000 reduction to the budget [with] no benefits.”

A salary range ordinance was introduced for the Maintenance Supervisor of Grounds establishing a minimum of $50,000 and a maximum of $70,000.

Contracts

Merit Trophies and Engraving, Inc., from Hackensack was the lowest bidder and was awarded a contract to supply trophies and awards for the Department of Parks and Recreation for a twenty-four month period for a fee not to exceed $46,915.

Bill’s Landscape and Design of Ridgefield was awarded a contract for lawn service and chemical fertilization. The contract is in the amount of $35,890, the lowest bid, and will be for a 12-month period.

The Vital Statistics report for the month of January indicated a total of $7,294 was collected in fees for death certificates, burial permits, marriage licenses and certificates, birth certificates, corrections, civil union licenses, and civil union certificates.

The township’s shooting range for the North Bergen Police Department will now charge a fee for use by outside law enforcement agencies. The fees will be a minimum of $250 for up to four hours and $50 for each additional hour, not to exceed a total of eight hours a day. Also, each separate day’s use will require a $250 minimum charge.

Any agency granted permission to use the range must provide the township with a properly executed Hold Harmless Agreement, which means that one party agrees to not sue the other for certain expenses, losses or damages that may occur. The agreement must be satisfactory to the township attorney and proof of liability insurance coverage of $1 to $3 million must be provided as well.

Vanessa Cruz can be reached at vcruz@hudsonreporter.com

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